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11 downloads
Found in: Medieval

:: Character Map

character map

:: File Contents

filenamefilesizetypeoptions
SEPUD___.TTF 47 KB Font File download
INSTALL.txt 14 KB Text File  
shareware.txt 3 KB Text File  

:: Font Sepultura

Designer Name: The Scriptorium
License: Free for Personal Use

:: Font Description

SCRIPTORIUM FONT LIBRARY MINI-MANUAL



EXTRACTION

If you receive your fonts on CD, ignore this section. If you

got your fonts on floppy or through the internet the files will be

stuffed in a single archive file using Stuffit for the Macintosh

or compressed with PKunZip for the PC. To extract Stuffit

archives, just click on them and they will unstuff to the destination you

specify. To extract PKZip archives you will need a copy of PKunZip. If

you don't have a current copy you can obtain one from any online service

or from our website at http://www.ragnarokpress.com/scriptorium.



INSTALLATION

Macintosh: If you are using System 7 all you need to do is drop the

fonts you wish to use on your system folder and they will automatically be

placed in the Font folder. If you are using an older version of the system

software you will need to drop the fonts on the system file itself. Before

installing fonts determine whether you wish to use True Type or Postscript.

For Postscript install the .bmap file and the file with no suffix. For

Trutype just install the .suit file. Do not install both Postscript and

Truetype unless you rename one of the suitcases so that they will not

conflict.

MS DOS: Where you install the fonts will depend on the program you

are using. Consult your manual for more information.

Windows: Click on the Control Panel icon. In the Control Panel

click on the Fonts icon. Select add fonts. In some cases you may need to also

add the fonts specifically to the programs you are using. Consult the

program manual for more information.



TROUBLESHOOTING

Font Appears as Boxes (Macintosh): First, check to make sure that

none of the characters display properly. Some calligraphic, display and

decorative initials fonts may have only upper or lower case characters, but

not both. This is not a defect, but a traditional characteristic of those

types of alphabets. If it's not one of these obvious things and the problem

persists, it is an indication that the font is too complex for

the memory configuration which you are currently using. This is most

likely to happen when using the Postscript versions under system 6.X, on a

68000 Macintosh, or on a system with less than 4 megabytes of system

memory. However, with more complex fonts it can occur with more powerful

systems. It can also be the result of programs which have poor memory

management. In some cases assigning additional memory to the application

you are using can solve this problem, but the more complex the font is, the

more memory it demands. We have never encountered any problems on any

systems which have a 68030 or better processor and at least 8 megabytes of

memory, but some of the newer Macintoshes, although nominally equivalent to

an SE/30 or better, have inexplicably poor memory management. In the worst

case scenario your system just may not be able to run some of the most

complex fonts without some sort of hardware or software upgrade.

Font Not Visible on Screen or Appears Only in Small Point Sizes

(PC): This is essentially the same problem as the one noted above on the

Macintosh. It means that your system is not powerful enough to handle the

number of points in the font you're trying to use. This problem is

particularly troublesome with PCs running Windows, but it will be fixed

with the release of Windows95. This generally occurs with art and

decorative initials fonts, but the limitations on the PC are even more

severe than on the Macintosh, so on older systems it may occur with less

complex fonts as well. It is less likely to happen with TrueType fonts

than with Postscript, and can only be dealt with by getting a more powerful

PC. Generally a 486 or better with at least 8 megabytes of memory should

have no problems. If you cannot upgrade your hardware you may find that you

can still use the more complex fonts in a limited context. Generally you

should be able to use smaller point sizes with multiple characters, or

print one or two individual characters in larger point sizes, even if they

don't appear on the screen.

Font Appears Not to Have Apostrophes: This is a quirk of certain

word processing programs which can be configured to use a non-standard

apostrophe character in place of the standard apostrophe included in all

our fonts. Some programs, including Microsoft Word may come configured to

use the alternative apostrophes. Consult your manual to reconfigure the

software, or for the key combination necessary to access the correct

apostrophe.

Font Prints with Rays or Lines on it: Generally a problem with

Postscript versions of the most complex fonts and certain art or font

sampling programs. Not much you can do except try a different program.

Font Prints Only Some Lines of Some Characters (PC): This is

another function of PCs with insufficient memory, generally only with those

fonts with many overlapping points, particularly decorative initials. This

may be fixable by changing the settings on your printer (see printer

manual). Alternatively it should not be a problem if you print only a few

characters at a time, which is normal use for this type of font anyway.





FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS



Q: How do I install fonts on my Macintosh?

A: If you are using System 7 or later all you need to do is drop the

fonts you wish to use on your system folder and they will automatically be

placed in the Font folder. If you are using an older version of the system

software you will need to drop the fonts on the system file itself. Before

installing fonts determine whether you wish to use True Type or Postscript.

For Postscript install the .bmap file and the file with no suffix. For

Trutype just install the .suit file. Do not install both Postscript and

Truetype unless you rename one of the suitcases so that they will not

conflict.



Q: How do I install fonts on my PC?

A: If you are using Windows 3.1 or Windows 95, click on the Fonts Control

Panel icon. Click on the Add button. At this point you may need to give

the computer the proper path to find the fonts on a floppy or CD or

wherever you've stored them on your hard drive. Alternatively you may have

to use the File menu in the Fonts Control Panel, which has Install Font as

an option. In some cases you may need to also add the fonts specifically

to the programs you are using. Consult the program manual for more

information. In MS DOS where you install the fonts will depend on the

program you are using. Consult the program's manual for more information.



Q: What's the difference between TrueType and Postscript fonts?

A: Postscript fonts consist of two files, a screen font and a printer font.

As it is used today it is a format developed by Adobe and adopted by other

font foundries. It is used primarily by high-end imagesetters who prefer

it because the relationship between screen image and printed output is

more reliable. In most cases you need Adobe Type Manager to use Postscript

fonts effectively. TrueType fonts consist of a single file which contains

both the screen and printer versions of the font. It is a format developed

jointly by Apple and Microsoft as an alternative to Postscript. TrueType

is easier to use, and modern TrueType fonts are usually equal in quality

of output to Postscript fonts, but by tradition some conservative service

bureaus and printers are reluctant to work with TrueType fonts.



Q: How do I access characters which aren't part of the standard keyboard?

A: On the Mac you may be able to access many of these special characters

by combining the option key with the regular keys. To find out how to

do this use the Keycaps Desk Accessory. In Windows you will probably

access these characters with the Alt key and a numerical sequence. To

see a listing of alternate characters and get the codes, use the Character

Map accessory in the Program Manager.



Q: Why do the characters in my font print as boxes?

A: First check to make sure that all the characters are printing as

boxes. Some fonts only have upper or lower case characters because they

are based on historic calligraphy which only had one form for each letter.

This is not a defect, but a traditional characteristic of those

types of alphabets. If it's not one of these obvious things and the problem

persists, it is an indication that the font is too complex for

the memory configuration which you are currently using. This is most

likely to happen when using the Postscript versions under system 6.X on a

68000 Macintosh, or on a system with less than 4 megabytes of system

memory. However, with more complex fonts it can occur with more powerful

systems. It can also be the result of programs which have poor memory

management. In some cases assigning additional memory to the application

you are using can solve this problem, but the more complex the font is, the

more memory it demands. We have never encountered any problems on any

systems which have a 68030 or better processor and at least 8 megabytes of

memory, but some of the newer Macintoshes, although nominally equivalent to

an SE/30 or better, have inexplicably poor memory management. In the worst

case scenario your system just may not be able to run some of the most

complex fonts without some sort of hardware or software upgrade.



Q: Why do characters in my font vanish at larger point sizes?

A: This is essentially the same problem as the one noted above on the

Macintosh. It means that your system is not powerful enough to handle the

number of points in the font you're trying to use. This problem is

particularly troublesome with PCs running Windows 3.X, but is more or

less fixed in Windows95. This generally occurs with art and

decorative initials fonts, but the limitations on the PC are even more

severe than on the Macintosh, so on older systems it may occur with less

complex fonts as well. It is less likely to happen with TrueType fonts

than with Postscript, and can only be fixed by upgrading to Windows95 and

possibly getting more memory as well. You may find that you

can still use the more complex fonts in a limited context. Generally you

should be able to use smaller point sizes with multiple characters, or

print one or two individual characters in larger point sizes, even if they

don't appear on the screen.



Q: Sometimes Font Smoothing makes my fonts look strange. Should

I use it?

A: Windows95 offers a feature for printing called Font Smoothing,

which may lead you to wonder if your fonts aren't smoothe enough. The fact

is that they are just fine



Q: Why are there no apostrophes or quotation marks in my font?

A: Some programs use a feature called 'smart quotes' which looks for

alternative versions of these symbols. Consult your manual to reconfigure the

software to turn off smart quotes, or for the key combination necessary to

access the correct

apostrophe.



Q: What are Minuscule and Majuscule letters?

A: These are calligraphic terms referring to the two main styles of character.

They literally mean small and large, but in modern usage minuscule means

lower case characters and majuscule means upper case characters. However,

in some calligraphy, particularly Uncial styles, the minuscule may

only be a smaller, simpler variation of the majuscule form.



Q: What is the difference between Cursive, Script and Italic?

A: Cursive means refers to a 'running' hand in calligraphic lettering,

where all of the characters are connected and flow together. Traditionally

this differentiates it from Uncial lettering which consists of distinct

characters. Script means any type which is designed to resemble

handwriting. Italic refers to the slanted style of type introduced by

Aldus Manutius in the 17th century and in general to any slanted or

skewed font. So, if a font is slanted it's italic, if the characters are

connected it's cursive, and if it does so in a way which simulates

handwriting, it is script.



Q: What is the difference between Black Letter, Gothic and Old English?

A: There really isn't any. All of the terms refer to early type styles

based on the calligraphic style generally referred to as Quadrata.

Black Letter is a general term for these styles. Gothic refers specifically

to modern type used as the standard for text in Germany before World War I.

Old English is an Anglo-American term for these same styles developed to

divorce them from the German associations.



Q: What does it mean when a font is called Antiqua, Old Style or Archaic?

A: All of these terms basically indicate that the font was

designed to have the characteristics of early printed type. These

characteristics usually include

capital letters which are considerably larger and bolder in relation to the

lower case letters than is the case with more modern type, and some unusual

letter forms.



Q: A font I bought doesn't have a 'j', 'u', or 'w', or these characters look

funny. Why?

A: A lot of our fonts are based on historical calligraphy or

antique type designs. In the middle ages and the ancient world there were

no letters for 'j', 'u' or 'w'. These letters are variations of 'i' and 'v'

respectively and were developed in the last few hundred years. In cases where

a font is based on historical lettering we may substitute the appropriate

character for those which weren't used at that time, so you get 'i' for 'j' and

'v' for 'u' or 'w'. With very complex fonts like decorative intiials we

may leave those characters out alltogether. In some cases we include

transitional

forms, such as the older style of 'w' which looks like a 'n' and a 'u' or 'v'

joined together. In some cases where it seems appropriate we will create

compatible versions of these modern characters and add them.





ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE

If you need help, feel free to contact us through our email

address at [email protected], or come to our website for special

customer support at http://www.ragnarokpress.com/scriptorium





Ragnarok Press Shareware Agreement

By using or installing this software, you agree to be bound by the terms of this
Agreement.

Number of Users: This shareware font is licensed to you and you alone as an
evaluation copy

Duration of Use: This shareware font may be used for private purposes or for
evaluation for a period
of 30 days, after which time it must be either registered or uninstalled.

Redistribution: You may not redistribute or duplicate this shareware font by any
means without
express written permission from Ragnarok Press.

Modifications. You may not modify, adapt, translate, reverse engineer,
decompile, disassemble, or
create derivative works based on the Scriptorium product without prior written
consent from
Ragnarok Press.

Backups: You may make one (1) copy of this Scriptorium product solely for backup
purposes
provided the copyright and trademark notices are reproduced in their entirety on
the backup
copy.

Use & Registration of Fonts: Fonts included in this package are distributed as
shareware. Use of
the font in any form other than personal evaluation obligates the user to
purchase the full version
of the font. This can be done from our website at http://www.fontcraft.com or
by phone with a
credit card by calling 1-800-797-8973, or by mail from Ragnarok, POB 140333,
Austin, TX 78714.

Limited Warranty: This font is distributed as shareware with no warranty of
any kind, either expressed or implied, including, but not limited to the implied
warranties of
merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. It doed not have a
complete character set or
other features which are in the full version of the font. Ragnarok Press does
not warrant
that the functions contained in the Scriptorium Product will meet your
requirements or that the
operation of the software will be uninterrupted or error free.If you want a full
font with a full
warranty, purchase the complete version.

Under no circumstances and under no legal theory, tort, contract, or otherwise,
shall Ragnarok
Press or its suppliers or resellers be liable to you or any other person for any
indirect, special,
incidental, or consequential damages of any character including, without
limitation, damages for
loss of goodwill, work stoppage, computer failure or malfunction, or any and all
other commercial
damages or losses.

This Agreement represents the complete agreement concerning this license between
the parties
and supersedes all prior agreements and representations between them. It may be
amended only
by a writing executed by both parties. If any provision of this Agreement is
held to be
unenforceable for any reason, such provision shall be reformed only to the
extent necessary to
make it enforceable. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed under
the laws of the
State of Texas.

All contents of this package Copyright 2000, Ragnarok Press

If you have any questions concerning this Agreement, or if you desire to contact
Ragnarok
Press for any reason, please contact us in writing at:

Ragnarok Press
POB 140333
Austin, TX 78714

or through our website at:

http://www.ragnarokpress.com/scriptorium

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